Why Alcohol and Methadone Should Never Be Mixed

Alcohol Addiction | LakehouseRecoveryCenter.comMethadone changes the way the brain and nervous system respond to pain and cravings.  Alcohol also affects the brain and nervous system and can cause symptoms such as difficulty walking, blurred vision, slurred speech, slowed reaction times, and impaired memory.  Methadone and alcohol are both depressants so when taken together, it increases the intensity of the effects which can include slowed heart rate, lowered blood pressure, and restrictive breathing.  Methadone will also increase the effects of alcohol and make a person get drunk faster.  Taking these two together can ultimately cause respiratory complications, low blood pressure, a weak heart, and coma.  It is more likely to overdose when using methadone and alcohol together.  Overdose side effects of methadone and alcohol may include:

  • anxiety
  • body aches
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • hallucinations
  • nausea
  • palpitations
  • respiratory problems
  • heart problems
  • shortness of breath
  • unconsciousness
  • vomiting

 

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